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Akira (English version)
Sunday, August 18th, 2024
at 18:15
Date
Sunday, August 18th, 2024
at 18:15
Location
Main screening room
Date
August 18th, 2024
Duration
124 min
Cycle
Science fiction

Science fiction pushes the boundaries, explores the improbable, and envisions the future of humanity. It also exposes us to extravagant visual effects and the inventive power of cinema, reflecting our deepest fantasies. In cinema, science fiction is immersive, creating worlds suddenly within our reach. This summer, over one hundred films from the history of cinema will allow us to witness this!

Akira
Directed by
Katsuhiro Ōtomo
Language
English version
Origins
Japan
Year
1988
Duration
124 min
Genre
Animation, action, drama, fantasy, science fiction, thriller
Format
35 mm
Synopsis

Thirty years after the unexplained destruction of Tokyo in 1988, Neo Tokyo is preparing to host the 2020 Olympic Games. As a member of a group of idle young bikers, Tetsuo is injured while fighting a rival gang. He tried to avoid a strange child who looked like an old man. Instead of taking him to hospital, the military transport him to be studied, as this accident seems to have given him a gift for psychokinesis.

Akira

Katsuhiro Ōtomo

Katsuhiro Ōtomo is a Japanese manga artist, writer, and director of animated films, best known for creating the manga Akira and directing its cinematic adaptation. Akira debuted in Young Magazine in December 1982, captivating audiences with its blend of classic science-fiction themes like psychic manipulation and dystopia, set in a meticulously crafted post-apocalyptic world. Ōtomo's innovative storytelling reinvented Japanese comics, earning him global recognition from both professionals and critics. As the 1990s dawned, Akira was translated into English and French, sparking a manga boom in English-speaking and French-speaking countries where the genre was still relatively unknown. To keep pace with the demanding publication schedule, Ōtomo established his studio, MASH Room, marking the beginning of his career as a director. His 1988 adaptation of Akira remains one of the greatest animated films of all time. While he shifted away from drawing manga, Ōtomo continued to write screenplays, contributing to acclaimed films such as Rōjin Z (1991), Metropolis (2001), and Steamboy (2004), which he also directed.

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About Katsuhiro Ōtomo
Filmography
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